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Protocol - Depressive Symptoms - Depression in Dementia

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Description:

Informant and patient interviews assessing signs and symptoms of major depression in patients with dementia in community, hospital, and aged care home settings. Information is collected from both the informant and the patient because some patients give unreliable reports.

Protocol:
Protocol Name from Source:

The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia

Availability:

Publicly available

Personnel and Training Required

The interviewer must be trained to conduct personal interviews with individuals from the general population. The interviewer must be trained and found to be competent (i.e., tested by an expert) at the completion of personal interviews. The interviewer should be trained to prompt respondents further if a "don't know" response is provided.

Equipment Needs
Pencil and paper
Requirements
Requirement CategoryRequired
Mode of Administration

Interviewer-administered questionnaire

Life Stage:

Participants:

Older adults with dementia

Specific Instructions:
Selection Rationale

The CSDD is a validated, widely used instrument designed for the assessment of depression in older people with dementia.

Language

Standards
StandardNameIDSource
Process and Review

The Expert Review Panel has yet to review this measure.

Source

The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) Administration & Scoring Guidelines

General References
Protocol ID:

121703

Variables:
Export Variables
Variable NameVariable IDVariable DescriptionVersiondbGaP Mapping
Research Domain Information
Measure Name:

Depression Symptoms

Release Date:

July 2, 2018

Definition

A self-report questionnaire to assess symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD).

Purpose

This measure can be used to rapidly assess depressive symptoms and select cases and non-cases. Depression is a common disorder that demonstrates a familial pattern and is comorbid with other psychiatric disorders, including anxiety disorder, substance use disorders, and eating disorders. Additionally, certain medical conditions-such as diabetes, stroke, and heart disease-can increase the risk of depression. Some individuals who present with major depressive episodes may have a bipolar spectrum disorder.

Keywords

Psychiatric, depression, bipolar disorder