Loading…

Protocol - PTSD Symptoms, Self-report - DSM-IV

Add to My Toolkit
Description:

The PTSD Checklist (PCL) for The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) is a 17-item self-report measure that assesses DSM-IV-based criteria in the past month. Each item is rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale (1 = Not at all; 5 = Extremely) that indicates how much the participant has been bothered by the event.

Protocol:

PCL-C

INSTRUCTIONS: Below is a list of problems and complaints that people sometimes have in response to stressful life experiences. Please read each one carefully then circle one of the numbers to the right to indicate how much you have been bothered by that problem in the past month.

Not at all

A little bit

Moderately

Quite a bit

Extremely

1.

Repeated, disturbing memories, thoughts, or images of a stressful experience from the past?

1

2

3

4

5

2.

Repeated, disturbing dreams of a stressful experience from the past?

1

2

3

4

5

3.

Suddenly acting or feeling as if a stressful experience were happening again (as if you were reliving it)?

1

2

3

4

5

4.

Feeling very upset when something reminded you of a stressful experience from the past?

1

2

3

4

5

5.

Having physical reactions (e.g., heart pounding, trouble breathing, sweating) when something reminded you of a stressful experience from the past?

1

2

3

4

5

6.

Avoiding thinking about or talking about a stressful experience from the past or avoiding having feelings related to it?

1

2

3

4

5

7.

Avoiding activities or situations because they reminded you of a stressful experience from the past?

1

2

3

4

5

8.

Trouble remembering important parts of a stressful experience from the past?

1

2

3

4

5

9.

Loss of interest in activities that you used to enjoy?

1

2

3

4

5

10.

Feeling distant or cut off from other people?

1

2

3

4

5

11.

Feeling emotionally numb or being unable to have loving feelings for those close to you?

1

2

3

4

5

12.

Feeling as if your future will somehow be cut short?

1

2

3

4

5

13.

Trouble falling or staying asleep?

1

2

3

4

5

14.

Feeling irritable or having angry outbursts?

1

2

3

4

5

15.

Having difficulty concentrating?

1

2

3

4

5

16.

Being "super-alert" or watchful or on guard?

1

2

3

4

5

17.

Feeling jumpy or easily startled?

1

2

3

4

5

Scoring:

Scoring instructions are adapted from the handout "Using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-IV (PCL)" available from the National Center for PTSD at www.ptsd.va.gov.

A total symptom severity score (range = 17-85) can be obtained by summing the scores from each of the 17 items that have response options ranging from 1 "Not at all" to 5 "Extremely."

A provisional diagnosis can be established in three ways:

1) Determine whether an individual meets DSM-IV symptom criteria as defined by at least 1 B item (questions 1-5), 3 C items (questions 6-12), and at least 2 D items (questions 13-17). Symptoms that are rated as "Moderately" or above (responses 3 through 5 on individual items) are counted as present.

2) Determine whether the total severity score exceeds a relevant normative threshold (e.g., for primary care settings).

3) Combine methods (1) and (2) to ensure that an individual meets both the symptom pattern and severity threshold.

Protocol Name from Source:

This section will be completed when reviewed by an Expert Review Panel.

Availability:

Publicly available

Personnel and Training Required

None

Equipment Needs

None

Requirements
Requirement CategoryRequired
Major equipment No
Specialized training No
Specialized requirements for biospecimen collection No
Average time of greater than 15 minutes in an unaffected individual No
Mode of Administration

Self-administered questionnaire

Life Stage:

Adult

Participants:

Adults, ages 18 and older

Specific Instructions:

This measure includes both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 versions of the PTSD Checklist. The PhenX PTSD Working Group anticipates that scientific demands will dictate that researchers typically collect data in accordance with the most recent PTSD criteria and will use the DSM-5 version of the protocol. However, under special circumstances (e.g., when adding to older, existing data sets), researchers may decide to use the DSM-IV version instead.

Selection Rationale

The PTSD Checklist (PCL) for The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) is a brief, self-administered, widely used measure to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms that demonstrates good psychometric properties. The PCL for DSM-IV provides a quantitative measure of PTSD symptom severity that has been used in foundational research with trauma-exposed populations.

Language

English

Standards
StandardNameIDSource
Common Data Elements (CDE) PTSD Self-report Symptom Questionnaire Score 4588679 CDE Browser
Process and Review

This section will be completed when reviewed by an Expert Review Panel.

Source

Blanchard, E. B., Jones-Alexander, J., Buckley, T. C., & Forneris, C. A. (1996). Psychometric properties of the PTSD checklist (PCL). Behavioral Research and Therapy, 34, 669-673.

The PTSD Checklist (PCL) for DSM-IV is available for download from the National Center for PTSD at www.ptsd.va.gov.

General References

Bliese, P. D., Wright, K. M., Adler, A. B., Cabrera, O., Castrol, C. A., & Hoge, C. W. (2008). Validating the primary care posttraumatic stress disorder screen and the posttraumatic stress disorder checklist with soldiers returning from combat. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 272-281.

Harrington, T., & Newman, E. (2007). The psychometric utility of two self-report measures of PTSD among women substance users. Addictive Behaviors, 32, 2788-2798.

Monson, C. M., Gradus, J. L., Young-Xu, Y., Schnurr, P. P., Price, J. L., & Schumm, J. A. (2008). Change in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms: Do clinicians and patients agree? Psychological Assessment, 20, 131-138.

Sherman, J. J., Carlson, C., Wilson, J. F., Okeson, J., & McCubbin, J. A. (2005). Posttraumatic stress disorder among patients with orofacial pain. Journal of Orofacial Pain, 19, 309-317.

Walker, E. A., Newman, E., Dobie, D. J., Ciechanowski, P., & Katon, W. (2002). Validation of the PTSD checklist in an HMO sample of women. General Hospital Psychiatry, 24, 375-380.

Protocol ID:

122001

Variables:
Export Variables
Variable NameVariable IDVariable DescriptionVersiondbGaP Mapping
Research Domain Information
Measure Name:

PTSD Symptoms, Self-report

Release Date:

November 21, 2014

Definition

A questionnaire to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.

Purpose

This measure can be used to screen for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and as a quantitative measure of PTSD symptom severity.

Keywords

Trauma, Potentially traumatic event, Stress, Stressor, Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD