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Protocol - Executive Function - Direct Assessment - Adolescent

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Description:

The Trail Making Test (TMT) for Older Children is an accessible neuropsychological instrument that provides the examiner with information on a wide range of cognitive skills and can be completed in 5-10 minutes.

Protocol:

Trail Making Test, Part A

The examiner first shows the respondent a sample test that has numbers 1-8 distributed in random order. The examiner demonstrates the task and lets the respondent practice connecting the numbers in increasing order. The examiner then hands the respondent the actual test which has the numbers 1-25 distributed in random order and asks the respondent to connect them in increasing order as fast as possible without raising the pen from the paper. Respondents are scored based on speed and accuracy.

Trail Making Test, Part B

The examiner first shows the respondent a sample test that has numbers 1-4 and letters A-D distributed in random order. The examiner demonstrates the task and lets the respondent practice connecting the numbers to letters (one to A, A to two, etc.) in increasing order. The examiner then hands the respondent the actual test which has the numbers 1-13 and letters A-L distributed in random order and asks the respondent to connect them in increasing order as fast as possible without raising the pen from the paper. Respondents are scored based on speed and accuracy.

Protocol Name from Source:

Trail Making Test (TMT) for Older Children

Availability:

Proprietary

Personnel and Training Required

Personnel should be trained by a licensed neuropsychologist or other trained medical professional experienced with the Trail Making Test (TMT). Additionally, investigators are encouraged to have quality control procedures (such as videotaping sessions, etc.) in place to maintain consistency across examiners.

Equipment Needs

The examiner will need a copy of the test that includes the cue cards with the sequence of numbers and letters and the scoring instructions.

Requirements
Requirement CategoryRequired
Major equipment No
Specialized training No
Specialized requirements for biospecimen collection No
Average time of greater than 15 minutes in an unaffected individual No
Mode of Administration

Performance-based task

Life Stage:

Adolescent

Participants:

Adolescent (9-14 years old)

Specific Instructions:

Whereas the Trail Making Test (TMT) has two parts (Parts A and B), the PhenX Neurology Working Group recommends that Part B be used to measure executive function in adolescents.

The TMT is a proprietary, fee-based instrument that is available from Reitan Neuropsychology Lab, Inc.

Selection Rationale

The Trail Making Test (TMT) was selected because it is a standard, widely used, validated protocol.

Language

English

Standards
StandardNameIDSource
Process and Review

Expert Review Panel 4 (ERP 4) reviewed the measures in the Neurology, Psychiatric, and Psychosocial domains.

Guidance from ERP 4 included the following:

  • Added new measure
  • Added new protocol
  • Created new Data Dictionary

Source

Reitan Neuropsychology Lab. The Adolescent Trail Making Test (TMT).

The TMT is a proprietary instrument and can be obtained through:

Reitan Neuropsychology Lab
POB 66080
Tucson, AZ 85728-6080
USA
Telephone: (520) 577-2970
Fax: (520) 577-2940

General References

None

Protocol ID:

131601

Variables:
Export Variables
Variable NameVariable IDVariable DescriptionVersiondbGaP Mapping
Research Domain Information
Measure Name:

Executive Function - Direct Assessment

Release Date:

November 28, 2017

Definition

An interviewer-administered test to measure a respondent’s system of high-level cognitive functions such as abstract thinking, rule acquisition, cognitive flexibility, and goal-oriented behavior.

Purpose

This measure tests a respondent’s total range of function with respect to executive function. It is therefore more specific and sensitive than a measure of global mental status and can be used to assess major problems in executive function as well as minor variations that may be a consequence of normal development and aging.

Keywords

neurology, sickle cell disease, SCD, cognition, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, aging, proprietary, attention deficient hyperactivity disorder, ADHD